Correspondence

Through a hospital window…

Posted by on Mar 1, 2012 in Correspondence, FAMILY, Medical | 0 comments

Health care is a topic of great, current debate in Canada. With changing times, demographics, government priorities and practices, change in medical services is also inevitable. I hope we continue to honour the spirit and heart of Tommy D’s work in these changes. We  have come
to know, enjoy and expect one of the best sytems in the world.
 
As he was recently discharged from hospital, I asked Blessed to tell us a little  of how it is to need medical attention in Uganda.  
Here is his reply:
“Well as you know mother, our hospital systems are very different from yours.
For instance, when patients are in hospital, they require someone to be always with them to care for them……like changing the patient’s clothes, buying, preparing and bringing food, feeding and sleeping besides the patient.
Now this is the point when i hate our Uganda. Maybe this also involves corruption.  
It is even more the case more when it comes to the government hospitals where you must pay in advance for your patient to be worked on more effectively. And then you have to pay to get out of the hospital too.
When a patient has no money, then you know they will not be worked on. Or they will being worked on with no effective methods, until you bring the required money,
that is why we are  more poor.
Most rural people when they get sick, they have to suffer looking for funds for their patients. Like selling their land or their goats or chickens for their patient’s medical cares. And they are the one who gets sick more…their lives are at risk, and their resources few.
I remember when my grandmother solid most of her lands to take her sons and daughters suffering from HIV/AIDS to the hospital.”
This small window into medical care in Uganda inspires in me gratitude for what we have but also a strong desire and responsibility to redistribute health care resources to make medical care more accessible and available in Uganda as well as many other developing countries in the world.
We can do this.


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A letter from Augustine…

Posted by on Feb 21, 2012 in Correspondence, FAMILY | 0 comments

A letter from Augustine…

We know how sweet and rare it is to get a real, handwritten letter in the mail along with the pizza deals, real-estate offers and proverbial bills. Last week I received a letter from Augustine out of the blue. It was her  first letter ever ! What a treat and what an honour.  She is asking for friendship, for a penpal. What a lovely link for me. You know I wrote back instantly!

Augustine is a student at Nyaka School in SW Uganda. Nyaka School is, in fact, not too far as the crane flies, from where The Candles live and go to school. However Nyaka school is VERY different from the Candles’. Nyaka is a thriving community school envisioned, built and directed by an extraordinary Ugandan, Twesigye Jackson Kaguri. I met him at viu 2 years ago when he came to talk to us during MultiCultural week. The work he is doing is exemplary and piquing the interest of other African Nations. Check out the link below to their website. You’ll be touched and inspired.

/www.nyakaschool.org/

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Amidah emails

Posted by on Dec 5, 2011 in Correspondence | 0 comments

Amidah emails

Amidah and Dori have begun emailing for the first time. It is really great to get to know Amidah. She is a student at the YMCA College in Wandegeya District    in Kampala where she studies Community Development.

Amidah has shown herself to be a natural writer and she is oh! so helpful. She has taken some of the load off her twin brother, Blessed. They both live in Kamapala and support The Candles from there. They also visit and spend time with their cousins in the village, Kabesheshe, when they can.

Amidah was in Kabesheshe for her Christmas holidays. Among many things, she taught the kids how to weave mats from banana leaves. They learn many good lessons directly and indirectly from Amidah. She is a great role model. She shows them that girls can achieve post secondary education, follow their dreams and make a difference in their village. Amidah, like Blessed, is a leader in her family and village.

http://www.ymcakampala.org/

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